Haiti Democracy Project

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DECLARATION OF THE DEMOCRATIC CONVERGENCE

Aware of its responsibilities in the context of the persistent crisis, the executive board of the Democratic Convergence reiterates its commitment to the holding of true negotiations aimed at reaching a framework agreement. This would help avoid a repeat of the electoral crime of May 21, 2000 or the electoral coup d’état of November 26, 2000. It will also help reinforce democracy, improve the respect for human rights, free the international financial aid, and stop the drug traffic transiting Haiti towards the United States of America. In order to achieve this, concrete actions must be taken, instead of promising speeches, by the de facto power of Lavalas.

For that reason, the Democratic Convergence has supported Resolution CP/RES.806(1303/02) of January 15, 2002, adopted by the Permanent Council of the Organization of American States. The resolution aims at reestablishing democracy through the adoption of a range of decisive measures that the Haitian government must take in order to “create necessary conditions for the resumption of negotiations sponsored by the OAS.” Within that framework, the main objective of the memorandum presented on May 9, 2002 by the Convergence was to determine concretely the points to be carried out by the de facto government of Lavalas, to stop political violence, and to create a favorable environment for the negotiations. Those points included disarmament, an end to the persecutions of journalist and political activists of the opposition, and struggling against the impunity for political crimes, particularly those of December 17, 2001.

Clearly stated, the de facto Lavalas government must be forced to abide by an agenda including the minimal conditions required by Resolution 806 of the Permanent Council of the OAS:

a) the investigation of political crimes and prosecution of those responsible for these crimes;

b) the arrest of the murderers of Ramy Darn of Gonaives, and the assassins of journalists Jean L. Dominique and Brignol Lindor;

c) legal action against individuals implicated in the arson of the headquarters of political parties and homes of opposition leaders;

d) disarming contested elected officials and gang members throughout the country, with an international technical supervision of the National Police;

e) reparations to the victims of the December 17, 2001 events.

Consequently, the executiveboard of the Democratic Convergence wants to reiterate its position as follows:

1. The Democratic Convergence shall abstain from any negotiation with Lavalas as long as the Haitian de facto government does not take decisive measures to “create necessary conditions for the resumption of negotiations sponsored by the OAS,” according to Resolution 806 of the hemispheric Organization.

2. The disappointment experienced by the Friends of Haiti countries over the Lavalas de-facto government's record of compliance with its previous agreements; the latter’s refusal to abide by Resolution 806 of the OAS, supported by all parties inside and outside the country; and the incapacity of the hemispheric organization to bring about implementation of the resolution raised serious questions about whether Lavalas would honor an eventual accord.

3. The Democratic Convergence recalls that it never asked the international community to freeze funds intended for Haiti, as Lavalas would falsely have us believe. The international community would have to take the sole responsibility for giving any financial aid to a regime marred by corruption and embezzlement.

Port-au-Prince, June 10, 2002

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